Best Practices in Assessing Community Engagement (BPACE)

make your time with students and community meaningful

Best Practices in Assessing Community Engagement (BPACE or “Bee-Pace”) is a catalog of learning opportunities for faculty and staff in higher education. Through BPACE, participants can increase their knowledge, skills, and attitudes around not only various inquiry practices – assessment, evaluation, tracking, monitoring, etc. –  but also the variety of initiatives, programs, or pedagogies that connect campus – its people, resources, practices) with community (our people, assets, organizations, issues or problems, etc..

overview

Since 2014, Indiana Campus Compact has made it a priority to provide our partners with support and service that focus on assessing campus-community engagement in higher education. The widely used label of “assessment” or the action of “assessing” campus-community engagement in higher education does not, however, do justice to the myriad of task, activities, and duties that encompass asking questions about, improving practice around, or—in general—inquiring about our campus-community engagement activities[1]. Because campus-community engagement can be understood as a broad array of activities—that now go well beyond one specific type of discipline or one specific type of “partnership”—there also need to be a broad array of activities that inquire about campus-community engagement.

bpace catalog

CIVIC LEARNING DURING COLLEGE

OVERVIEW

With the help of facilitators and mentors, participants will  develop and implement an assessment plan or project that targets students’ civic learning and development (e.g., working with others, civic communication, civic identity, civic literacy or knowledge). Participating in BPACE is beneficial to individuals and institutions seeking guidance in implementing, maintaining, strengthening, or expanding their current assessment plans to include a civic dimension.

FORMAT

Currently the SLO track of BPACE takes place online. READ: This is a 100% online learning experience hosted through the learning management platform Canvas, with synchronous, online meetings being held via Zoom. No travel or in-person meetings are expected as part of your enrollment in the SLO track of BPACE.

WHO SHOULD ENROLL?

Individuals in faculty or staff roles who are responsible for or oversee a course or program that involves students in a highly engaged learning practice (service-learning, experiential learning, internship, capstone project, undergraduate mentored research, learning community, etc.). Participants are expected to come with a specific curriculum, project, learning experience, or course in mind.

BENEFITS TO ATTENDEES

After completing the SLO track of BPACE attendees can expect to:

  • List and compare a variety of civic outcomes and how they apply to your course, program, curriculum, discipline, etc.
  • Identify appropriate assessment tools that align with the intended outcome and evaluate tools for applicability.
  • Practice applying assessment tools (direct or indirect) to student artifacts in order to measure civic learning and development.
  • Design a comprehensive, coherent, and transparent teaching and learning experience that enhances students’ civic learning and development.

Call for Co-Chair for the 2019-2020 Community of Practice
I.T. and the C.E.P.

WHO ARE WE LOOKING FOR?

  • An individual who can help us build a community around the topic of information technology (e.g. Collaboratory, GivePulse, GalaxyDigital, OrgSync, Lyons, Time2Track, Digital Measures-Activity Insight, etc.) and the practices of tracking or monitoring community engagement in higher education.
  • The ideal candidate will be a staff or faculty member at any Campus Compact partner campus in the country, who has 2-5 years of experience in evaluating, onboarding, integrating, and sustaining one or more information technology (I.T.) platforms for providing data on unit or institutional campus-community engagement activities.
  • Further, this individual should have experience in forming groups (establishing norms, building trust and rapport, developing traditions or expectations, etc.) and leading small or large group-work that begets a mutually beneficial and informative learning artifact.
  • Finally, the individual should have a solid foundation of knowledge surrounding the best practices and characteristics of campus-community engagement, and they should be able to discuss the role inquiry activities have in informing community engaged activities and the institutionalization of community engagement in higher education.

Learn more here.

Examining partnerships, relationships, and the many other types of “ships” that constituents on our campus form with various types of communities and/or the impact of those partnerships. 

WANT TO LEARN MORE? CONTACT OUR DIRECTOR OF ASSESSMENT HERE >>- anne {at} incampuscompact(.)org

Assessing organizational learning and change that occur as a part of normalizing or institutionalizing campus-community engagement activities—WE WILL ANNOUNCE DETAILS ABOUT THIS TRACK IN WINTER 2020.

We will explore the learning and development of faculty who engage in campus-community partnerships to inform their teaching, to conduct research, or as a part of serving their community (e.g., sitting on a community organization’s Board of Directors)

WANT TO LEARN MORE? CONTACT OUR DIRECTOR OF ASSESSMENT HERE >>- anne {at} incampuscompact(.)org

Evaluating the fidelity of our teaching interventions that connect campus with community, in other words exploring how well staff and faculty implement the key characteristics (e.g., critical reflection) of these learning moments.

WANT TO LEARN MORE? CONTACT OUR DIRECTOR OF ASSESSMENT HERE >>- anne {at} incampuscompact(.)org

ENROLLMENT FEES for any track of bpace

  • Enroll from an Indiana Campus Compact or Ohio Campus Compact partner institution: $200
  • Enroll from any other Campus Compact partner institution: $300 per person
  • An individual from a non-Campus Compact partner institution: $600

Through the leadership, creativity, and expertise of Indiana Campus Compact staff and our stakeholders we have identified six key areas of inquiry that are typically focused on when exploring the inputs, outputs, and outcomes (short, medium, and long-term) of campus-community engagement. These themes also align well with the topics of articles that explore, empirically, something about the impact of campus-community engagement, which we see published in peer-reviewed journals across our disciplines and fields. The themes that we have identified to best encompass the inquiry we need to support across our partner campuses can be found in the tabs below.

[1] Weiss, H.A. & Norris, K.E. (2019). Community engagement professionals as inquiring practitioners for organizational learning. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement 23(1), retrieved from http://openjournals.libs.uga.edu/index.php/jheoe/article/view/2196