Thursday, April 24, 2014

Resources

Institutional Structures for Service-Learning in Higher Education

Fact sheet from the National Service-Learning Clearinghouse describes the various types of institutional structures for service-learning in higher education and lists examples

Embedding Service Engagement into Your Institutional Culture

Three years ago, Indiana Campus Compact invited campuses to participate in The Institutionalization of Service Engagement in Higher Education: A Rubric for Institutional Planning.  Throughout May 2009, 11 campus steering committee teams participated in five regional workshops using the rubric as a guide.  Since that time, Indiana Campus Compact has provided technical assistance around the rubric when requested on a case-by-case basis.  Because we heard from campuses that participated in 2009 that this process was beneficial to strengthen the partnership between Academic and Student Affairs on their respective campuses, and it truly helped them reflect on where they have been and where they plan to go as an overall institution.

Because of this, Indiana Campus Compact is reintroducing the rubric (Download Rubric Here) and inviting new campuses, and campuses that were part of the 2009 process, to participate in this opportunity to reflect upon where your campus is in institutionalizing service engagement and to start planning where you would like to be in the future. Through this process we hope to:

1. Help campuses with self-assessment and potential strategic planning in the area of service engagement. This process offers campuses:

  • A chance for reflection for where campuses are and where they want to go in this area;
  • An opportunity to develop a vision for this realm of work;
  • An occasion to begin to document work in service engagement to help prepare for award and other applications; AND
  • Information to assist Presidents and Chancellors with a framework for the potential of service engagement opportunities and advancements.

2. Guide Campus Compact in its work with individual campuses and collective membership base. The information garnered through this assessment will be used to:

  • Guide campus visits and related programming; AND
  • Direct programming and technical assistance offerings.

This process is NOT intended to compare any campus to another.  It is a planning tool for your campus and for Campus Compact. Information from the participating campuses may be compiled to find themes, common ground and other trends, but it will not be used to rank, classify or compare campuses in any means. Information from individual campuses will only be shared with members of the campus steering committee team and the campus’s senior administration. Any information shared with a larger audience will be shared in the aggregate and will not identify specific campuses.

Workshop Option 1 –

Date: February 10, 2012

Time: 9:00 a.m. EST – 3:30 p.m. EST

Location: Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana—Southern (Sellersburg, Indiana)

Workshop Option 2 –

Date: February 17, 2012

Time: 9:00 a.m. EST – 3:30 p.m. EST

Location: University of Indianapolis Wheeler Arts Center (Indianapolis, Indiana)

Workshop Option 3 –

Date: February 24, 2012

Time: 8:30 a.m. CST – 3:00 p.m. CST*/9:30 a.m. EST – 4:00 p.m. EST

Location: Indiana University Northwest (Gary, Indiana)

*please note, Gary, Indiana, is on Central Standard Time (CST)

Pricing Information:
- Indiana Campus Compact member campuses—FREE
- Campus Compact member campuses outside of Indiana--$150 per campus team

- Non-Campus Compact campuses--$450 per campus team 

Please designate one person from the campus steering committee team to register the team.  To register, this “team leader” should visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/rubric_workshops.

 

 

New Research on Institutionalization - Vogel and Seifer

"Impacts of Sustained Institutional Participation in Service-Learning - Perspectives from faculty, staff and administrators" by Amanda L. Vogel, Sarena D. Seifer in Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, Vol 4 (2011)

The movement for greater civic engagement in higher education in the United States has taken hold across the core academic missions of teaching, research and service. One manifestation of this movement has been growing participation in service-learning, a teaching method grounded in community-university partnerships in which students provide services that simultaneously address community-identified concerns and meet key learning objectives. In order to assess the benefits of long-term sustained institutional involvement in service-learning, in 2007–2008 we interviewed 23 faculty members, staff and administrators from 16 academic institutions that had participated in a national demonstration program for service-learning, which ended in 1998.

Impacts of Sustained Institutional Participation in Service-Learning - Perspectives from faculty, staff and administrators

by Amanda L. Vogel, Sarena D. Seifer in Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement, Vol 4 (2011). The movement for greater civic engagement in higher education in the United States has taken hold across the core academic missions of teaching, research and service (Astin 1999; Boyer 1990; Community-Campus Partnerships for Health 200; Israel et al. 1998; Nyden 2003). One manifestation of this movement has been dramatic growth in faculty and student participation in servicelearning.

Read article here

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Indiana Campus Compact is grateful to Lilly Endowment Inc. for significant funding in support of programs, training,and resources for our member campuses that allow them to deepen their commitment to community engagement and service-learning.